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 Valleygirl
 
posted on November 30, 2001 08:29:08 AM new
I'm a northern girl transplanted to CA. However, I just spent two weeks in the south with my husband's family. They kept me in stitches with sayings used in casual and everyday conversations. I've never heard these sayings, and some needed my husband's interpretation. Most are either unprintable as said, or require heavy editing, so I'll try to keep them as clean as I can. What I'd like to hear from the members here are other regional or local phrases.

"shaking like a dog "passing" a peach pit."

(passing was NOT the word used), and with the word "passing" substituted below:

"passing" in tall cotton.


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 BittyBug
 
posted on November 30, 2001 10:27:45 AM new
Not southern unless being compared to Canada.

Dad always said "Shakin' like a dog "passin" razor blades.

Pitch pits, razor blades, hmmmm...doesn't sound like fun either way.
Please call me Charlotte so I don't have ta change my ID.
 
 antiquary
 
posted on November 30, 2001 10:44:51 AM new
"The wheels still turning, but the hamsters dead."

"...doesn't have a lick of sense."

 
 rawbunzel
 
posted on November 30, 2001 11:29:32 AM new
"I'd like three of those hats, one to s**t in,one to cover it up and one to fan the flies. "

My husband is from Kentucky and I guess that is a way to say you hate the hat someone has on.

 
 REAMOND
 
posted on November 30, 2001 02:09:46 PM new
"He's as %^&*$# up as Hogan's goat"

"Root hog or die"

"Think the rain will hurt the Rhurbarb ?"

"It was rainin' like a cow p*ssin' on a flat rock"

"It was rainin' like pouring p*ss out of a boot"

"Katie bar the door"

"Who tied the pup ?"

"He who stacks the hay must carry it away"

"Kill one of us as we need some relief"

"Where the skunks %$#@ the rabbits"
"Where the rabbit packs it lunch before it goes over the hill"

"It'll hold till we get a rope"

"It'll do until we get a better one"

"Colder than a well diggers a**"

"Young and full of p*ss and vinegar"

"Don't do that or all your babies will be born naked"

"It was so hot, the popcorn popped in the fields, the mule thought the popcorn fallin was snow, and he laid down and froze to death"

"It's so hot the dog'll stay under the porch all day"

"I wouldn't care to do that." = I would do that.


 
 hjw
 
posted on November 30, 2001 02:43:07 PM new


"I wanna hug your neck!!!"


Helen

 
 hjw
 
posted on November 30, 2001 02:46:11 PM new

Politicians and preachers will try to "piss on your leg and tell you it's raining".

Helen

 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on November 30, 2001 02:53:59 PM new
REAMOND: translations please!!



Not my name on ebay.
 
 REAMOND
 
posted on November 30, 2001 03:42:07 PM new
TRANSLATIONS:

"He's as %^&*$# up as Hogan's goat" = can be applied to people or things, means messed up, irrational etc..

"Root hog or die"= a way must be found to do something, i.e., it must be done one way or another.

"Think the rain will hurt the Rhurbarb ?"= a conversation opener, actually a rhetorical question.

"It was rainin' like a cow p*ssin' on a flat rock"= it was raining really hard.

"It was rainin' like pouring p*ss out of a boot" = see above.

"Katie bar the door"= all hell is breaking loose.

"Who tied the pup ?"= who caused/created the problem.

"He who stacks the hay must carry it away"= you make the mess, you take care of it.

"Kill one of us as we need some relief"= 2 people in a situation that must be resolved.

"Where the skunks %$#@ the rabbits"= out in the sticks.
"Where the rabbit packs it lunch before it goes over the hill"= see above.

"It'll hold till we get a rope"= a temporary fix.

"It'll do until we get a better one" - see above.

"Colder than a well diggers a**"= answer to the question- how cold was it?

"Young and full of p*ss and vinegar"= young and full of energy, but no wisdom.

"Don't do that or all your babies will be born naked"= don't do that and I don't have a ready answer as to why you shouldn't or don't have time to explain.

"It was so hot, the popcorn popped in the fields, the mule thought the popcorn fallin was snow, and he laid down and froze to death"= answer to - how hot is/was it?

"It's so hot the dog'll stay under the porch all day" = see above.



 
 hjw
 
posted on November 30, 2001 04:16:48 PM new



I forgot to translate. Smack me upside the head.

Helen

 
 mybiddness
 
posted on November 30, 2001 09:03:30 PM new
From my dad, rest his soul...

That's about as worthless as tits on a boar hog.

I wish I had his pick up truck and he had a feather up his arse and we'd both be tickled.

sh*t or get off the pot.

hmmnnn... I never realized dad cussed so much.






Not paranoid anywhere else but here!
 
 yeager
 
posted on December 1, 2001 12:03:36 AM new
My mother used to say, "as useless as tits on a porcupine."

I live in Michigan and was at the local Target store the other day and
came across an elderly man who must have been at least 80. We
talked for a few minutes and as he spoke, I could easily see that he
was an educated person. During this conversation he said that he
had three degrees, one being a Ph.D. in education. He said in his
career as an educator he met some people that were "pretty lofty in
their own minds." His expression was that they were "Educated
beyond their intelligence."
[ edited by yeager on Dec 1, 2001 12:11 AM ]
 
 doxdogy
 
posted on December 1, 2001 05:52:48 AM new
I worked with one girl years ago. She came from Alabama. Whenever someone asked her what time it was she would tell them that it was:
Time for old dogs to die, ain't you glad you're a puppy.





 
 kcpick4u
 
posted on December 1, 2001 10:16:16 AM new
"You don't know $hit from Shinola" or "Your a$$ from a hole in the ground"

"You ain't just whistling Dixie"

"Shines like a new dime in a billy goat's a$$"

"Livin' high on the hog"

 
 nanastuff
 
posted on December 1, 2001 11:32:52 AM new
"I feel like a cat in a room full of rockin' chairs!"

 
 hjw
 
posted on December 1, 2001 04:55:22 PM new



How about some Valleygirl sayings? Aren't there any idgits in California?

Helen

 
 rgrem
 
posted on December 1, 2001 06:10:41 PM new
"Suckin' hind tit". This is from hog country and means getting the worst of the deal, or being considered last for everything.

 
 virakech
 
posted on December 3, 2001 08:01:34 PM new
"You're 'bout as useful as a bear cub j##king off with boxing gloves"

"If yer mad, rub the mad 'till it gets glad"

"Let your food stop your mouth"

"If I owe ya money, at least you'll never be broke"

"You go ahead and try...I'll knock your d##k in the dirt"

"he was so sceered he ran like a strip-ed a**ed ape"

"Slicker 'n snot on a doorknob"

"finer 'n frog hair"

and I never heard one of these phrases until marrying my wonderful husband and meeting his 'southern' family.


 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 08:29:20 AM new
Virakeck: We are in the same boat. I love the colorful phrases, but I think my husband tires from translating for me. What is amusing to me is how the phrases flow from the tongue in casual conversation.

I remember when we were first married, we were visiting my husband's grandparents. My husband's cousin had shot several squirrels and she was going to cook them for him. (I was totally grossed out, all my meat came from the grocery store). Anyway, he handed her one particular squirrel and he said, "granny, this one has big nuts". My mouth flew open, that a 14 year old would say such a thing to his grandmother. Later, in private, I asked my husband about the conversation. It appears that when a squirrel gets older (and therefore tougher meat) the private parts of the squirrel get larger and that is one way to determine how tough the meat will be. He was telling her to cook the meat longer because the older male squirrel would be tough.

To this day, I am still teased about that conversation that took place 30 years ago. And I'm still horrified that someone would talk about an animal's private parts with a grandmother. So nothing has changed.


Not my name on ebay.
 
 hjw
 
posted on December 4, 2001 08:53:28 AM new
colloquialisms

I have lived and visited in the deep south for many years and I have not heard these vulgar expressions.

The colloquialisms that you have mentioned must be local and not regional. In other words, you were on the wrong side of the tracks.

Similar expressions can be found in the North, East and West. I can travel 10 miles from my home in Maryland and hear language that I would also need an interpreter to translate.

Helen

 
 hjw
 
posted on December 4, 2001 09:00:39 AM new

Depending on who you marry, you might have inlaws from New York, California or Washington, DC with similar vulgar speech patterns.

 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 09:12:44 AM new
Helen, I respectfully disagree with you about his family being from the wrong side of the tracks. I suggest that your travels allowed you to meet with people in situations that would not allow one to speak casually. To proceed further would be rude. My husband's family is definately not from the wrong side of the tracks. To suggest so, when you don't know them is rude.


Not my name on ebay.
 
 hjw
 
posted on December 4, 2001 09:45:23 AM new

You are depicting the South as a specific area in which crude and vulgar language is used.

I consider that rude and inconsiderate.

Helen



[ edited by hjw on Dec 4, 2001 09:46 AM ]
 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 09:53:26 AM new
You added your own vulgarity, then insulted the rest of us.

I'm amused that you took a fun thread, contributed towards it, then berated and insulted us. But for equal opportunity, since my mother is from the north, and full of fun expressions, I will also start a thread on northern sayings. But, please don't contribute. You aren't invited to this party.


Not my name on ebay.
 
 hjw
 
posted on December 4, 2001 09:56:05 AM new

I have well educated relatives all over the south from Mississsippi to Texas and I'll bet that they have never heard most of the quotes here and have certainly never used them.

Helen

 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 10:00:42 AM new
Helen,I merely asked for sayings that people had heard in the south. People contributed and translated. We all had a laugh. You are the one you got a burr under your saddle (oops, there is another one) and said they were vulgar (after contributing your own). I never said I was "depicting the South as a specific area in which crude and vulgar language is used." All this came from you.




Not my name on ebay.
 
 hjw
 
posted on December 4, 2001 10:02:05 AM new
Valleygirl

I contributed to it before it became vulgar and nasty.

Your invitation is not necessary on this board. I can contribute to any thread that you may start. But I prefer not to.

Helen

 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 10:07:24 AM new
Yours was as vulgar as any other.


Not my name on ebay.
 
 rawbunzel
 
posted on December 4, 2001 11:23:47 AM new
Dan Rather seems well educated and he used plenty of Southern sayings on election night. [he was a riot!<<<< hey maybe that's a northern saying!] It has not anything to do with what side of the tracks one is from. My own husband is from Kentucky and does use some of these saying and when we have visited there that is where I hear them . Washington [the state where I live] , unfortunatly does not seem to have any such sense of humor.We don't seem to have any fun sayings except those we borrow from our more clever southern neighbors.

We also ,like, imitate Valley Girls. Like ,duh.

Nothing original in this Washington.



 
 Valleygirl
 
posted on December 4, 2001 04:23:12 PM new
Maybe I need to change my name. The valley comes from: I now live in a valley after living in So Cal Desert for 30 years. And girl comes from the fact that I'm hardly a girl. The worst thing we (So Cal) do is drive too fast and have no patience.


Not my name on ebay.
 
 
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